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lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

(Source: uvmsemba)

Your mind completely opens up to the true nature of our existence, which is that we are not bodies, that we are pure loving spirit created by God, that God is love, and there is nothing but love, and love, being all encompassing, has no opposite. You are completely forgiven on all things, and there is nothing you’ve ever done that has ever swayed God’s pure and unconditional love for you and you realize that eternity, and peace, and heaven is our inheritance and all of us are going to make it there.
Bill Hicks talking about his experience with shrooms. (via billhicks)

(Source: kev-la-kill)

thepeoplesrecord:

Israel using illegal weapons in Gaza
July 21, 2014

Israeli occupation forces are using lethal and internationally banned weapons in their aggressive war against the Palestinian people in the Gaza Strip, experts and witnesses said this morning.

Israeli warplanes fired white phosphorus munition in the eastern Gaza Strip. White phosphorus burns fiercely and can set cloth, fuel, ammunition and other materials on fire, and cause serious burns or death. It was heavily used by Israel during its savage war on Gaza in 2008/2009, and caused many severe casualties.

Meanwhile, witnesses said that the Israeli occupation used flechette bombs on Saturday in the Shujaya neighbourhood causing the death of 100 civilians in the bloodiest day Gaza has witnessed so far.

Doctors saw bodies with nail shrapnel, and removed them from the wounds of those who came into hospital. While, several people and journalists collected nails from bomb sites and posted their photos on Facebook.

In the early days of the Israeli war, Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert told a press conference in Al-Shifa Hospital that he found effects of DIME weapons on the bodies of the Palestinian casualties.

"A good number of the injuries seen here are consistent with the use of dense inert metal explosives, or DIME, that we saw during the 2009 attack and also in 2006," said Gilbert.

He continued: “The bodies are pretty much destroyed by the enormous energy released by the explosives that are shot near them or at them.”

Source

Illegal weapons supplied by $8.5 million daily aid from the US to Israel.

kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery
The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 
Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 
Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 
Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 
Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 
Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 
Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 
Zoom Info
kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery
The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 
Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 
Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 
Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 
Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 
Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 
Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 
Zoom Info
kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery
The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 
Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 
Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 
Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 
Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 
Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 
Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 
Zoom Info
kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery
The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 
Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 
Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 
Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 
Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 
Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 
Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 
Zoom Info
kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery
The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 
Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 
Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 
Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 
Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 
Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 
Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 
Zoom Info
kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery
The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 
Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 
Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 
Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 
Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 
Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 
Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 
Zoom Info

kiaoratibet:

The Library at Sakya Monastery

The Sakya sect of Tibetan Buddhism are renowned for their academic abilities and have historically produced some of Tibet’s most famous scholars. It comes as little surprise then that their library is immense and possible the biggest surviving collection of texts in Tibet. 

Somehow Sakya’s southern monastery was saved from most of the destruction of the cultural revolution, so it is now regarded as having the largest collection of Tibetan Buddhist artefacts in Tibet. You can tell just by looking around how much of a difference there is between being here in a preserved ancient monastery with real ancient artefacts all around as opposed to a rebuilt one. 

Sakya’s library consists of hundreds of thousands of volumes including multiple versions of the Kangyur and Tengyur: the teachings of the Buddha and commentaries on these teachings. In a glass box at the far end of the library room is one of the largest handwritten sutras in Tibet, written in gold ink on a scroll made of leather. 

Our monk guide told us that apparently when all of the scriptures were put into these shelves they were neat and orderly, but the way that they now sit is a reflection of the state of world affairs. When the world is in a state of peace the scriptures appear straight and level, but as bad events occur the volumes tend to slip and become messy and uneven. 

Along the main wall of the library room some scriptures could even be seen protruding from the main stack by 30cm or so, which we were told happens only when a major negative world event occurs. Our monk guide pointed out a couple that date back to the world wars, and have been left sitting in that way because when at first they were pushed back in somehow the scriptures came out again the next day. The monks believed that this was an auspicious sign that they should be left like that, and have hung ceremonial silk scarves on the end of them. 

Stories of magic such as this are common in Tibet, and not a touch of doubt is held by the devotees who come here that these stories are truth. Of course the scriptures move of their own accord, why shouldn’t they? 

Note: Photography is usually not permitted in the library room, and there are several signs in multiple languages that remind visitors of this. However, I asked special permission of the monks in charge and they kindly allowed me to take photos here. 

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